Windows Defender ATP: Onboarding your Windows 10 endpoints, do it the right way!

In the early days of onboarding Windows 10 endpoints to Windows Defender ATP you had to define a custom device configuration policy via Intune, in order to enable and register your Windows Defender ATP agents at scale.

Onboard Windows Defender ATP via custom device configuration policy.

Continue reading “Windows Defender ATP: Onboarding your Windows 10 endpoints, do it the right way!”

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Unleash your Azure CSP subscription for Cloud Management Gateway deployments

The cloud management gateway (CMG) provides a simple way to manage Configuration Manager clients on the internet. By deploying the CMG as a cloud service in Microsoft Azure, you can manage traditional clients that roam on the internet ‘without’ additional (on-premise) infrastructure.

Merged_Azure_CSP_and_Visual_Studio_subscription

Create & deploy cloud services with an associate Azure subscription.

However, there is a limitation when deploying CMG using Azure CSP subscription.

This capability does not enable support for Azure Cloud Service Providers (CSP). The CMG deployment with Azure Resource Manager continues to use the classic cloud service, which the CSP does not support. For more information, see available Azure services in Azure CSP.

As CSP model is becoming more and more popular as Azure subscription, this scenario is a potential blocker for many customers having a CSP subscription which wants to deploy a CMG. The Microsoft product teams are aware of this situation and I’m sure they will solve this the sooner or later.

Converting your CSP subscription to an eligible Azure subscription is no option here (managed by CSP Partner). Therefore I would like to take you how to deploy a CMG while you’re on a CSP subscription. Yes it’s possible! In this blog I’ll describe what it takes to achieve this. Continue reading “Unleash your Azure CSP subscription for Cloud Management Gateway deployments”

Troubleshooting Cloud Management Gateway: Quick & effectively /w CMG Connector Analyzer

In Configuration Manager Current Branch 1806, Microsoft introduced the Cloud Management Gateway Connector Analyzer. A highly valued feature which is a great starting point to troubleshoot your Cloud Management Gateway (CMG) in case you ran in to any issues. In short, it’s a more than welcome and helpful feature!

In a nutshell the Cloud Management Gateway Connection Analyzer validates you Cloud Management Gateway deployment on 6 points, namely:

  1. Validates whether CMG is in a ready state;
  2. Validates whether CMG services are running;
  3. Validates whether CMG is using a up to date configuration;
  4. Validates connection state between CMG Connection Point and CMG;
  5. Validates whether site systems are associated with CMG;
  6. Validates whether Management Point is available and/or well configured;

This blog post provides a first aid guidance to troubleshoot you Cloud Management Gateway(s).

Client Authentication Method

The Cloud Management Gateway Connection Analyzer can be found in the Cloud Services section part of the Administration pane. There are two clients authentication options to connect to the Cloud Management Gateway.

  • Azure AD User (this can be a regular Azure AD user);
  • Client certificate (currently use the Certificate File option as the console is by default started in a user context instead of system context);

CMG_sign_in

Once connected successfully with a valid Azure AD Account or Client Certificate we can start the connection analyzer to verify the Cloud Management Gateway is working properly.

Cloud Management Gateway Ready State

By deploying the Cloud Management Gateway as a cloud service in Microsoft Azure, you can manage traditional clients that roam on the internet without additional infrastructure. The cloud services authenticates and forwards Configuration Manager client requests to the CMG connection point. The status of the cloud services has the following statuses:

  • ServiceState 0 – Started
  • ServiceState 3 – UndergoingMaintenance
  • ServiceState 4 – Starting
  • ServiceState 5 – Stopping
  • ServiceState 6 – Stopped
  • ServiceState 7 – ReadyRole

The illustration below indicates the CMG service is in ready state and therefore available.

CMG_ready_state

CMG_cloudmgr.log

The illustration below indicates the CMG service is not in a ready state.

CMG_ready_state_maintenance

To troubleshoot CMG Ready state, use CloudMgr.log.

Cloud Management Gateway Services

The illustration below indicates the CMG service is running.

CMG_service_running

The illustration below indicates the CMG service is not running and therefore not available.

CMG_service_failed

In this case the CMG cloud services might be not running. To troubleshoot CMG services, use CMG-<cloud_service_name>-ProxyService_IN_0-CMGService.log (or CMG-<cloud_service_name>-ProxyService_IN_1-CMGService.log in case of 2 or more VM instances) and SMS_Cloud_ProxyConnector.log.

Cloud Management Gateway Configuration

The illustration below indicates the CMG configuration between on-premise CMG connection point and in CMG in Azure is in sync.

CMG_configuration_in_sync

The illustration below indicates the CMG configuration between on-premise CMG connection point and in CMG in Azure is in sync.

CMG_configuration_not_in_sync

This is an easy one, just makes sure the CMG configuration data is in sync by enforcing “Synchronize configuration” under Cloud Services section part of the Administration pane.

Cloud Management Gateway Connection Point

The CMG connection point is the site system role for communicating with the CMG. By default the CMG connection point establishes TCP-TLS connections (10140-10155) to connect to CMG cloud service in Azure. In case of 2 or more VM instances, the second VM instance uses port 10141, up to the sixteenth on port 10155.

CMG_tcp_connections_established

Make sure <cloud_service_name>.cloudapp.net:10140 is reachable and can be resolved (name resolution) properly. To troubleshoot CMG service health, use CMGService.log and SMS_Cloud_ProxyConnector.log.

The illustration below indicates the CMG configuration point is able to communicate with CMG in Azure.

CMG_connection_point_status

The illustration below indicates the CMG configuration point is not able to communicate with CMG in Azure.

CMG_connection_point_status_not_connected

To troubleshoot CMG services, use SMS_Cloud_ProxyConnector.log.

Site System roles assigned to Cloud Management Gateway

Make sure you have configured the management point and/or software update point site systems linked to your CMG to accept CMG traffic from clients which are on the internet.

CMG_site_system_role_assigned

When there is no site system role assigned (whether management point or software update point) clients on the internet won’t be able to take benefit of the concerning service(s).

CMG_no_site_system_role_assigned

Make sure you’ve assigned at least one management point or more to service clients on the internet.

Management Point Availability & Configuration

The CMG connect point forwards client communications to on-premise site system role(s) (management point(s) and/or software update point(s). In this case the site system roles should be available

CMG_management_point_status

In case you’ve bind a wrong web server certificate to you management point or software update point (IIS) or the certificate isn’t trusted (certificate chain) incoming client communications from CMG cloud service won’t be accepted.

CMG_pki_configuration

In the table below an overview of a few scenarios whereby the management point isn’t available for various reasons.

Error Solution
Failed to get ConfigMgr token with Azure AD token. Status code is ‘503’ and status description is ‘CMGConnector_ServiceUnavailable’. A possible reason for this failure is the CMG connection point failed to forward the message to the management point. The management point returned the following error: ‘ServiceUnavailable’.

Make sure IIS services is running properly.

Failed to get ConfigMgr token with Azure AD token. Status code is ‘500’ and status description is ‘CMGConnector_InternalServerError’. A possible reason for this failure is the CMG connection point failed to forward the message to the management point. Internal server error. For more information, see the management point logs for more details to see why internal server error returns.

Make sure you bind the right web server certificate to IIS or make sure the correct root- and/or intermediate CA is added.

Succeed to get ConfigMgr token with Azure AD token.

Failed to refresh MP location. Status code is ‘401’ and status description is ‘CMGConnector_Unauthorized’

A possible reason for this failure is the CMG connection point failed to forward the message to the management point. The management point returned the following error: ‘Unauthorized’.
Succeed to get ConfigMgr token with Azure AD token.

Failed to refresh MP location. Status code is ‘500’ and status description is ‘CMGService_No_Connector’.

A possible reason for this failure is the CMG service failed to forward the message to the CMG connection point. There is no CMG connection point that is connecting to the CMG service. For more information, see the SMS_CLOUD_PROXYCONNECTOR.log on the CMG connection point.

Make sure firewall or proxies aren’t blocking network traffic. Click here for a complete overview of ports required by CMG.

Cloud Management Gateway Log files

The following table lists the log files that contain information related to the cloud management gateway.

Log name Description Computer with log file
CloudMgr.log Records details about deploying the cloud management gateway service, ongoing service status, and use data associated with the service.

You can configure the logging level be editing the Logging level value in the registry key HKLM\SOFTWARE\ Microsoft\SMS\COMPONENTS\ SMS_CLOUD_ SERVICES_MANAGER

The installdir folder on the primary site server or CAS.
CMGSetup.log1 Records details about the second phase of the cloud management gateway deployment (local deployment in Azure)

You can configure the logging level using the setting Trace level (Information (Default), Verbose, Error) on the Azure portal\Cloud services configuration tab.

The %approot%\logs on your Azure server, or the SMS/Logs folder on the site system server
CMGHttpHandler.log1 Records details about the cloud management gateway http handler binding with Internet Information Services in Azure

You can configure the logging level using the setting Trace level (Information (Default), Verbose, Error) on the Azure portal\Cloud services configuration tab.

The %approot%\logs on your Azure server, or the SMS/Logs folder on the site system server
CMGService.log1 Records details about the cloud management gateway service core component in Azure

You can configure the logging level using the setting Trace level (Information (Default), Verbose, Error) on the Azure portal\Cloud services configuration tab.

The %approot%\logs on your Azure server, or the SMS/Logs folder on the site system server
SMS_Cloud_

ProxyConnector.log

Records details about setting up connections between the cloud management gateway service and the cloud management gateway connection point. Site system server

1 These are local Configuration Manager log files that cloud service manager sync from Azure storage every five minutes. The cloud management gateway pushes logs to Azure storage every five minutes. So the maximum delay is 10 minutes. Verbose switches affect both local and remote logs. The actual file names include the service name and role instance identifier. For example, CMG-ServiceName-RoleInstanceID-CMGSetup.log

  • For troubleshooting deployments, use CloudMgr.log and CMGSetup.log
  • For troubleshooting service health, use CMGService.log and SMS_Cloud_ProxyConnector.log.
  • For troubleshooting client traffic, use CMGHttpHandler.log, CMGService.log, and SMS_Cloud_ProxyConnector.log.

Sources

Please find below the resources I’ve used to writeup this blog post.

Microsoft, Plan for the cloud management gateway in Configuration Manager

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sccm/core/clients/manage/cmg/plan-cloud-management-gateway

Microsoft, Log files in System Center Configuration Manager

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sccm/core/plan-design/hierarchy/log-files#cloud-management-gateway

Further I want to pay attentions of a great blog post series of how to set up your Cloud Manage Gateway by fellow MVP Zeng Yinghua

SCConfigMgr, How to setup Co-Management

http://www.scconfigmgr.com/2017/11/23/how-to-setup-co-management-part-1/

Keep your Microsoft Intune tenant clean and tidy /w Azure Automation & Graph API

Nowadays Microsoft provides us a lot of flexibility to empower end-users to be productive as never before. Users are able to register their devices in order to access corporate resources anytime, anywhere on devices they love. Provisioning of Windows 10 devices to your enterprise has never been easier for end-users. They are even able to join their brand new devices to the corporate from home taking benefit of Windows Autopilot & Azure AD MDM auto-enrollment.

From an end-user perspective this is great, productivity can be restored in minutes instead of hours or even days. However the flexibility we provide for the end-users has a downside from an IT Admin perspective. As we’re able to join or register devices to Microsoft Intune/Azure AD, it causes a lot of obsolete device objects in your tenants. Continue reading “Keep your Microsoft Intune tenant clean and tidy /w Azure Automation & Graph API”

Microsoft Intune introduced High Available (HA) support for SCEP/PFX Connector

Since December 2017 Microsoft Intune introduced support for multiple active SCEP/PFX connectors per tenant in order to provide high availability for certificate handling.

Initially the Microsoft Intune SCEP/PFX connector didn’t provide support for high availability. The SCEP/PFX connector could be installed as an single instance with no option for multiple active connectors.

Microsoft Intune SCEP-PFX Connector
Microsoft Intune SCEP/PFX connector support multiple active connectors per tenant.

Continue reading “Microsoft Intune introduced High Available (HA) support for SCEP/PFX Connector”

Enable Windows 10 Multifactor Authentication with Windows Hello Multifactor Device Unlock & Microsoft Intune

In this blog post I’ll explain how to configure and enable Windows Hello Multifactor Device Unlock using Microsoft Intune. Windows Hello Multifactor Device Unlock provides multifactor device authentication for login or unlocking  Windows 10 devices.

Windows Hello for Business

Continue reading “Enable Windows 10 Multifactor Authentication with Windows Hello Multifactor Device Unlock & Microsoft Intune”

Part 2:  Improve your endpoint security /w Windows Defender ATP & Microsoft Intune: Exploit Guard & SmartScreen

In my previous blog I highlighted the Security Analytics Dashboard of the Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection and how to improve your organizations security excellence covering two improvement area’s: Windows Defender Antivirus and Windows Defender Application Guard.

In this blog I’ll cover two other improvement areas: Windows Defender Exploit Guard and SmartScreen Continue reading “Part 2:  Improve your endpoint security /w Windows Defender ATP & Microsoft Intune: Exploit Guard & SmartScreen”